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Electronic bingo is now illegal in Lowndes and Macon Counties, according to a Supreme Court of Alabama ruling today.

Casinos that offered “electronic bingo” in these counties included VictoryLand Casino in Shorter and Southern Star Entertainment Center in Hayneville.

According to an opinion written by Alabama Supreme Court Justice Greg Shaw “the Macon Circuit Court and the Lowndes Circuit Court erroneously denied or exceeded their discretion in denying the State's request in each case for injunctive relief prohibiting the Macon County defendants and Lowndes County defendants from continuing to engage in the illegal gambling activities at issue.” 

“Accordingly, we reverse their orders and remand these cases for the Macon Circuit Court to enter an order, within thirty days of this Court's issuance of the certificate of judgment, preliminarily enjoining the Macon County defendants, and for the Lowndes Circuit Court to enter an order, within thirty days of this Court's issuance of the certificate of judgment, permanently enjoining the Lowndes County defendants, from offering "electronic bingo" machines at any facility in their respective county, from receiving any moneys in relation to "electronic bingo" machines in operation in their respective county, from transporting or providing any additional "electronic bingo" machines to any facility in their respective county, and from receiving, utilizing, or providing bingo licenses or permits to play "electronic bingo" in their respective county,” Shaw wrote in his opinion. “Further proceedings in the Macon Circuit Court on the State's request for a permanent injunction shall be consistent with this opinion. Finally, because White Hall has waived all arguments at issue in its cross-appeal relating to the dismissal of its counterclaims, that portion of the Lowndes Circuit Court's order is hereby affirmed.”

All three decisions dealing with the “electronic bingo” issue were affirmed by the Supreme Court of Alabama’s eight other justices. The three cases were:

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